You can listen to Cloud 2020 incite here:

Episode One Episode Two Episode Three Episode Four Cast: CHARACTERS SURVIVOR 1: Katie Rae SURVIVOR 2: George Dix GHOST OF ARISTOPHANES: Martin Harvey STAGE MANAGER, Sebastian Emmerson STAGE HAND, Holly Fitzpatrick JUDITH BLACKTHORN, Emily Carding, a 50-something woman from Cymer, Wales, and her daughter Phillipa, have moved to Shoreditch, so that Phillipa can be aContinue reading “You can listen to Cloud 2020 incite here:”

Cranes in Ancient Greek Theatre – Josh Werrett, Assistant Classical Dramaturg

One aspect of the ancient Greek text which caused several issues during the conversion into a modern, radio adaptation was Aristophanes’ use of the crane. In our version, the use of technology and the pervasive theme of technomimesis are extremely important; in the original Clouds, the crane was an established piece of dramatic technology, whichContinue reading “Cranes in Ancient Greek Theatre – Josh Werrett, Assistant Classical Dramaturg”

Adaptation and Gerard Genette – Olga Kekis, Dramaturg

Cloud 2020 incite was born as a response to our concerns about what is happening around us in the world, in the Spring of 2020. We created it using Aristophanes’ The Clouds as a stimulus and an inspiration, and we used the ancient text as a scaffold on which we built our own construct. OurContinue reading “Adaptation and Gerard Genette – Olga Kekis, Dramaturg”

Process – Becca Warner, Assistant Dramaturg

To understand the process of how we created Cloud 2020, let me first introduce you to incite theatre company. The aim of this company is to re-imagine classical texts as contemporary political productions. In short: to make plays of the past relevant to an audience of today. Olga Kekis, Head Dramaturg, provides the framework forContinue reading “Process – Becca Warner, Assistant Dramaturg”

Mirrors – Amber Ash, Assistant Classical Dramaturg

Adapting a classical text brings with it issues of anachronism, and questions of how we can make the text relevant today. This is amplified in a text such as Aristophanes’s The Clouds, in which technology features so heavily. Significant technological advances have resulted in a disjunction between classical and modern technology, and how they createContinue reading “Mirrors – Amber Ash, Assistant Classical Dramaturg”

The Sex-Positive Legacy of Mae West – Becca Warner, Assistant Dramaturg

In 1933, Mae West purred “Why don’t you come up some time and see me?” Into the ear of her co-star Carry Grant in the film adaptation of her hit play ‘Diamond Lil’. The result was instantaneous, and she cemented herself as a household name and one of the most influential women in pop culture of the twentiethContinue reading “The Sex-Positive Legacy of Mae West – Becca Warner, Assistant Dramaturg”

Network – Becca Warner, Assistant Dramaturg

Counter-texts are texts that we used to form the world of the play as inspiration. DJ Hopkins describes them as an “alternative centre of gravity” or authority; they help to create a robust world that is grounded in history. They may be a film, television show or book; they may or may not make anContinue reading “Network – Becca Warner, Assistant Dramaturg”

Gods – Becca Warner, Assistant Dramaturg

There are a number of gods referenced in the play that come from Greek, Roman and Celtic pantheons. Judith’s religious beliefs are never solidified, although her practice of multi-pantheon worship is typical of neo-pagan religions such as Shamanism, Wicca, Druidism and many more. These practices are becoming more popular as society begins to imagine new ways of livingContinue reading “Gods – Becca Warner, Assistant Dramaturg”

Welcome to incite theatre

We are incite theatre company. We are a theatre collective dedicated to radical adaptations of classic texts. These adaptations are called hypertheatre. Interrogation of how representation creates reality is at the heart of our work. In particular, we’re interested in the social constructions of race, class, gender. We’re also exploring technomimesis. We’re asking: When didContinue reading “Welcome to incite theatre”